Welcome to the Gutenberg Editor (Supporting WordPress)

Of Mountains & Printing Presses

The goal of this new editor is to make adding rich content to WordPress simple and enjoyable. This whole post is composed of pieces of content—somewhat similar to LEGO bricks—that you can move around and interact with. Move your cursor around and you’ll notice the different blocks light up with outlines and arrows. Press the arrows to reposition blocks quickly, without fearing about losing things in the process of copying and pasting.

What you are reading now is a text block the most basic block of all. The text block has its own controls to be moved freely around the post…

… like this one, which is right aligned.

Headings are separate blocks as well, which helps with the outline and organization of your content.

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Handling images and media with the utmost care is a primary focus of the new editor. Hopefully, you’ll find aspects of adding captions or going full-width with your pictures much easier and robust than before.

Beautiful landscape
If your theme supports it, you’ll see the “wide” button on the image toolbar. Give it a try.

Try selecting and removing or editing the caption, now you don’t have to be careful about selecting the image or other text by mistake and ruining the presentation.

The Inserter Tool

Imagine everything that WordPress can do is available to you quickly and in the same place on the interface. No need to figure out HTML tags, classes, or remember complicated shortcode syntax. That’s the spirit behind the inserter—the (+) button you’ll see around the editor—which allows you to browse all available content blocks and add them into your post. Plugins and themes are able to register their own, opening up all sort of possibilities for rich editing and publishing.

Go give it a try, you may discover things WordPress can already add into your posts that you didn’t know about. Here’s a short list of what you can currently find there:

  • Text & Headings
  • Images & Videos
  • Galleries
  • Embeds, like YouTube, Tweets, or other WordPress posts.
  • Layout blocks, like Buttons, Hero Images, Separators, etc.
  • And Lists like this one of course 🙂

Visual Editing

A huge benefit of blocks is that you can edit them in place and manipulate your content directly. Instead of having fields for editing things like the source of a quote, or the text of a button, you can directly change the content. Try editing the following quote:

The editor will endeavor to create a new page and post building experience that makes writing rich posts effortless, and has “blocks” to make it easy what today might take shortcodes, custom HTML, or “mystery meat” embed discovery.

Matt Mullenweg, 2017

The information corresponding to the source of the quote is a separate text field, similar to captions under images, so the structure of the quote is protected even if you select, modify, or remove the source. It’s always easy to add it back.

Blocks can be anything you need. For instance, you may want to add a subdued quote as part of the composition of your text, or you may prefer to display a giant stylized one. All of these options are available in the inserter.

You can change the amount of columns in your galleries by dragging a slider in the block inspector in the sidebar.

Media Rich

If you combine the new wide and full-wide alignments with galleries, you can create a very media rich layout, very quickly:

Accessibility is important — don’t forget image alt attribute

Sure, the full-wide image can be pretty big. But sometimes the image is worth it.

The above is a gallery with just two images. It’s an easier way to create visually appealing layouts, without having to deal with floats. You can also easily convert the gallery back to individual images again, by using the block switcher.

Any block can opt into these alignments. The embed block has them also, and is responsive out of the box:

You can build any block you like, static or dynamic, decorative or plain. Here’s a pullquote block:

Code is Poetry

The WordPress community

If you want to learn more about how to build additional blocks, or if you are interested in helping with the project, head over to the GitHub repository.


Thanks for testing Gutenberg!

👋

Advertisements

Tech Talk – nVidia’s RTX 20xx series and raytracing

GamesCom 2018,  at a press conference hosted by nVidia’s finest in anticipation of their next generation technology. It revealed among the  GeForce RTX 2070 ($500 USD),  RTX 2080 ($700), and high market – RTX 2080 Ti ($1000), all of which will release on September 20, 2018.

They also flaunted their recent iteration of nVidia raytracing rendering software – as RTX Ray Tracing, with various trailers from Star Wars and Battlefield V showing phenomenal jumps in both visual appeal and realistic representation of ray tracing.

There are both Rendered Scene trailers such as Battlefield V and Star Wars with help from YouTube (links below)

 

And a Real Time Demo of Shadow of The Tomb Raider.

Although with some Social skepticism on various Facebook outlets, Some believe that this should be running at 60fps at 4k (1080 x 4) if not running at “a higher fps to cleanse any anomolies like sparkling, or ants”, Other notable comments mentioned the entry prices and the likelihood of influence from crypto-currencies inflating market prices ($500/ £399/€459 as a starting price for an entry level graphic’s card genuinely sounds steep!)

With the announcement – The RTX 20xx series came under scrutiny after a benchmark test was performed on the GOTTR and could not perform ray tracing at 4k as an optimum target resolution at 60fps and many valid suggestions implied that the advertised 50% increased speed to the 1080Ti is an exaggeration of capability and that even with optimum settings an on-average : 30% maximum with optimisation would be a realistic expectation.

My Thoughts : Given it’s specification and it’s predecessor’s specification. This is a case of GDDR5 vs GDDR6 with how ray tracing is performed and implemented, if it is physically calculated using GPU resources it will take Gigabits in memory bandwidth..
The significant difference in bandwidth then between GDDR5 and 6 is voided by software calculations justifying a lot of scrutiny which could have been avoided with an additional core that could do the calculations without loss of framerate or bandwidth hogging.

 

Game Development 102 (for dummies like me)

Alright, so I said that I would have something to display, for Game Development – particularly 102.

In this post – we’ll explore Trigonometry and how games use it, assuming you followed the previous post and brushed up on the subjects (physics wasn’t really necessary, but I did say it was a bonus, it’s basically for the more advanced stuff such as “trajectory” and kinetic energy, I didn’t do Physics but it’s a fundamental unwritten rule for Development of a game to understand terms – I’ll elaborate later on this, if you plan on building a shooter game, you’ll need to determine how long a bullet travels for at whatever angle, and what the trajectory would be, what the loss of acceleration blah blah (didn’t do physics excuse)… a perfect example for this is Battlefield and it’s somewhat simulated coding for “Bullet Drop”.. but that’s for another time..(when I actually understand it in a little more detail)

Continue reading